Showing posts with label ivory teff flour. Show all posts
Showing posts with label ivory teff flour. Show all posts

October 15, 2009

Multigrain Bread with Pate Fermentee (B&P30)



What could be better than a hearty and delicious teff multigrain roll? My kids would say a 15 inch gluten free pepperoni pizza. Well...they've got me there.  However, these are mighty tasty rolls with a lovely crisp crust.

You will need to do a little preplanning to fix this recipe. You will need 9 different grains along with flaxs eed and unsalted sunflower seeds to make the multigrain soaker.  I used chia seeds (salba), sesame seeds, whole plantago seeds (psyllium or Indian wheat), hemp seeds, pumpkin seeds, quinoa, millet, teff, amaranth and teff.  If you want you can substitute black sesame seeds for the plantago seeds. Then you will need flax seeds (gold or brown) and unsalted sunflower seeds, in addition to the 9 seeds and grains.

Enjoy!


Recipe

Protein Content:
Original Content: 15.82 g
GF Content: 15.8 g

9 Grain Soaker (28 g)

3 g chia seeds (salba)
3 g whole plantago seeds (psyllium or Indian wheat)
3 g hemp seeds (shelled)
3 g sesame seeds
3 g pumpkin seeds
3 g kasha
3 g amaranth grain
3 g millet grain
3 g quinoa grain
3 g teff grain (brown or ivory)
4 g flax seeds (brown or golden)
6 g unsalted sunflower seeds
39 ml water, cold

Combine all the seeds, grains and water in a plastic container and cover with a lid. Soak at room temperature until the mixture has absorbed the water, approximately 8 to 12 hours.

Note: According to On Food And Cooking: The Science And Lore Of The Kitchen (2004) by Harold McGee, do not use sorghum in sprouting, because as the seed germinates, it produces a protective cyanide-generating system. It's found in the seed coating. (pg. 482)  I would recommend avoiding using sorghum in the soaker.

Dough

15 g brown rice flour (1.35 g)
11 g sweet rice flour (.66 g)
10 g arrowroot starch (.3 g)
22 g white bean flour (3.06 g)
__________________________replaces bread flour
12 g sesame seed meal (3.06 g)
24 g ivory teff flour (2.64 g)
24 g brown rice flour (2.16 g)
__________________________replaces wheat flour
24 g instant dry yeast
4 g sea salt
105 ml water
10 ml agave syrup
66 g pate fermentee
64 g 9-grain soaker

1. Place all the dry ingredients in a large bowl and blend together. In a medium sized bowl, pour in the water, agave syrup, pate fermentee and the 9 grain soaker, then stir. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients until it forms a soft ball.

2.  Place in the center of a sheet of parchment paper that has arrowroot starch sprinkled on it. Divide the dough into 8 balls.  Slice down the center with a sharp knife.  Slide the parchment paper onto a cookie sheet and set in a warm location and allow to rise for 1 hour. 

3.  Place a baking stone in the oven and preheat to 450 degrees F/232 degrees C.  Slide the parchment paper onto the baking stone and bake for 15 minutes.  Cool completely before serving.

Other Baking & Pastry Project Posts


Index of the Baking & Pastry Project

Baking & Pastry Project #29 - Lean Bread with Pate Fermentee
Baking & Pastry Project Week 15 - Lean & Multigrain
Baking & Pastry Project #28 - Berliners
Baking & Pastry Project #27 - Yeast Raised Doughnuts
Baking & Pastry Project Week 14 - Doughnuts


Want More?

You can also follow me on Twitter, where I'm glutenagogo.

October 3, 2009

Teff & Montina Pita (B&P26)



Baking & Pastry Project #26 - Teff & Montina Pita


With this recipe, I wanted to work with a flour I haven't used in a while - Montina. It's a type of perennial Indian ricegrass that grows wild from Southern Manitoba to the hills of Southern California. It's a wonderful flour that is high in protein and fiber.


It's a fabulous flour that goes in a wide variety of baked goods.  I enjoy using it in anything that has chocolate as it provides an additional layer of rich flavor. My children particularly enjoy chocolate chip cookies with Montina flour.


The flour blend for the pita rounds, is like a earthy whole wheat. It is a bit darker in color and tastes delicious. My husband and I thoroughly enjoyed these, but they were a bit too strong in flavor for our kids.


Recipe

Protein Content: 
Original Content: 29.64g
GF Content: 28.80 g

10 g Montina flour (0.7 g)
10 g brown rice flour (0.9 g)
20 g sweet rice flour (1.2 g)
20 g arrowroot starch (0.3 g)
48 g white bean flour (10.32 g)
6 g chia seed meal (1.26 g)
__________________________replaces the bread flour

12 g cocoa powder (3.23 g)
53 g ivory teff flour (5.83 g)
44 g millet flour (5.06 g)
__________________________replaces the wheat flour

20 g instant dry yeast
5 g sea salt
4 g sugar
4 g agar agar powder
190 ml water
12 g olive oil
25 ml agave syrup

1. Place all the dry ingredients into a large bowl and stir. Pour all the liquid ingredients into a medium sized bowl. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry ingredients and blend thoroughly.

2. On a piece of parchment paper sprinkled with arrowroot starch, divide the dough into 6 pieces of equal size. Beginning with the first piece of dough, press it out into a round shape that are about 7 inches/18 cm in diameter. Continue with the other pieces of dough in the order that they were divided. Use arrowroot starch as needed to work the dough. Place the parchment paper on a cookie sheet, then relocate it to a warm location and allow the pita dough to rise for 30 minutes.

3. Place a baking stone into the oven and preheat the oven to 500 degrees F/260 degrees C. Slide the parchment paper with the pita rounds onto the baking stone. Bake for 3 to 4 minutes, so that the pita rounds are puffed, but not browned.  Cool before serving.

Other Posts in the Baking & Pastry Project

Index of Baking & Pastry Project Posts

Baking & Pastry Project #24 - Lavosh
Baking & Pastry Project #23 - Pizza
Baking & Pastry Project Week 12 - Pizza & Crackers
Baking & Pastry Project #22 - Soft Pretzels
Baking & Pastry Project #21 - Crescia al Formaggio
Baking & Pastry Project Week 11 - Parmesan & Pretzels
Baking & Pastry Project #20 - Craquelin
Baking & Pastry Project #19 - Brioche
Baking & Pastry Project Week 10 - Brioches

September 30, 2009

Baking & Pastry Project Week 13 - Flat Breads

Bread & Pastry Project Week 13 - Flat Breads




One of my favorite tweaks on gluten free baking is to use two sometimes three different types of binders. A binder is what holds your gluten free baked good together, such as xanthan or guar gum, flax seed meal, gelatin, pectin, agar agar or chia seed meal. There are other gums that are not as readily available and tend to cost a bit more, for example gum arabic, kuraya or tragacanth gum.

The idea is that each gum works in a particular way. Therefore, if you have more than one you will have the holding power of both types of gums. Look in your freezer case for your ice cream container. In the list of ingredients you will find things like xanthan gum and methylcellulose or xanthan and guar gum. Ice cream tends to travel a long way from the factory to the eater's house. In that journey the ice cream will be subjected to a variety of temperatures. The gums help the ice cream maintain it's fluffy texture and mouth feel. Otherwise, you would end up with a container of ice cream that has partially melted and refrozen while in transit.

A couple of other things to think about while your thinking about binders: taste and quantity. Each gum, meal or powder has it's own flavor. In small amounts it might not be that noticeable, but when used in larger quantities it can change the flavor of your baked good. For a bread like pita, you will need a lot of binding strength so that the bread holds together when you open the pocket and place your filling inside. If you use any one binder in sufficient quantity to hold it together, you maybe adding a competing flavor to your bread. This is the perfect bread for using more than one binder. Try out my choice of chia seed meal and agar agar powder or xanthan gum and pectin, perhaps another combination.

I hope you enjoy this week's breads. The naan has a warm and nutty flavor from sunflower seed meal and the pita bread is rich and earthy from ivory teff flour.

Schedule

Thursday, 10/1 - Naan


Saturday, 10/3 - Pita


Shopping List


Brown Rice Flour (Fine or Superfine Grind)
Sweet Rice Flour (also called glutinous rice flour)
Arrowroot Starch
Almond Meal
High Protein Flours, such as: Soybean, White Bean, Black Bean
Whole Grain Flour, such as: Buckwheat, Millet, Sorghum, Quinoa, Teff
Instant Dry Yeast
Binding Agents, such as: Xanthan or Guar Gum, Chia Seed Meal, Agar Agar Powder
Plain Yogurt
Clarified Butter
Sunflower Seed Meal


Resources

Flours & Binding Agents: Authentic Foods, Barry Farm, Bob's Red Mill
Instant Dry Yeast: Barry Farm
Agave Syrup: Wild Organics, Native Seeds


Equipment


Baking Stone


What's Going On?


I was a very lucky woman and received a copy of the Culinary Institute of America's Baking & Pastry book along with their culinary dvd's from my family for my birthday and our anniversary. After watching all the DVDs, I decided to work my way through the CIA's Baking and Pastry book - of course making it gluten free. There were so many skills that I wanted to develop and work on. I hope you will be interested in sharing my journey with me.


Want More?


You can also follow me on Twitter, where I'm glutenagogo.


Other Baking & Pastry Project Posts

Baking & Pastry Project #24 - Lavosh

Baking & Pastry Project #23 - Pizza
Baking & Pastry Project Week 12 -
Baking & Pastry Project #22 - Soft Pretzels
Baking & Pastry Project #21 - Crescia al Formaggio
Baking & Pastry Project Week 11 - Parmesan & Pretzels
Baking & Pastry Project #20 - Craquelin
Baking & Pastry Project #19 - Brioche
Baking & Pastry Project Week 10 - Brioches


Index of Baking & Pastry Project Posts



September 26, 2009

Sesame Teff Lavosh (B&P#24)




Baking & Pastry Project #24 - Lavosh


I discovered a new way to upset a 13 year old guy... Take him into a dance store while a group of 14 to 15 year old girls get fitted for pointe shoes. To increase his torment, make sure it is a store that recently received all their new fall stock. Not the place to be if you don't like pink and frilly things.

The action was a little over the top with teenage girls flitting here and there looking for a spot at the barre. Legs flying up in different ballet positions, so they could check out the fit of the shoes. You had to be careful where you walked so you didn't get hit by flying feet or run into a racks filled with leotards, sweaters and leg warmers while dodging the dancing bodies.


It took almost an hour later, but finally we were able to walk out with a couple of lined leotards and a new pair of ballet slippers. I was last out of the door and when I caught up with my kids, my son was grousing under his breath and my daughter agreeing with him. When she saw me and said, "Mom, there was too much pink in there. It was going crazy!"


I did make it up to them this week. Their pottery class in wheel throwing started at the art school. Two hours of getting dirty, slinging clay and creating something with your hands. After two hours they bounced out of the classroom filled with stories and covered in drying clay. My taller than me son, put his arm around me and said, "Thanks for signing me up. This was great! It was so cool when I lost control of my pot and it slung off the wheel and hit the wall! Then I exploded my best pot when I put too much water on it." He bounced away from me throwing out his arms and cried, "That's how I got like this!" All I could think of was the line from the movie Madagascar, where the chimpanzees and other animals are in Grand Central Station surrounded by police and animal control. "If you have poo fling it now." Nothing like playing in the mud to put a smile on your face.

With that smile in mind, my family thoroughly enjoyed this sheet of lavosh. My daughter created a plate of antipasto and placed a few chunks of lavosh on it. My son ate it with some German Bauernschnicken (a nice cured German ham) that we were trying out. My husband and I broke out the Uniekaas cheese, olives and a glass of red wine to enjoy our lavosh.  There was even enough left over for the kids to enjoy as a late snack.


Recipe

Yield: 1 sheet lavosh
Protein Content:
Original Amount: 21.34 g
GF Amount: 20.81 g

15 g sweet rice flour (0.9 g)
15 g arrowroot starch (.045 g)
18 g millet flour (2.07 g)
28 g white bean flour (6.02 g)
6 g chia seed meal (1.26 g)
__________________________replacement for bread flour
10 g sesame seed flour (2.55 g)
10 g sweet rice flour (2.06 g)
16 g arrowroot starch (0.048 g)
__________________________ replacement for durum flour
10 g brown rice flour (1.4 g)
10 g sweet rice flour (0.73 g)
10 g arrowroot starch (0.03 g)
__________________________replacement for cake flour
20 g ivory teff flour (1.1 g)
10 g Montina flour (0.7 g)
__________________________replacement for wheat flour
11 g instant dry yeast
9 g sea salt
4 g agar agar powder
25 - 30 ml agave syrup
80 ml whole milk, room temperature
55 ml water
6 g molasses
6 g honey
olive oil
seeds of your choice or coarse salt

1. Put the dry ingredients in a large bowl and stir together. In medium bowl pour in the liquid ingredients and mix together. Pour the liquid ingredients into the dry and thoroughly blend.

2. Place a sheet of parchment paper on a cookie sheet and sprinkle sweet rice flour or arrowroot starch on the paper. Place the lavosh dough in the center of the parchment paper and sprinkle with sweet rice or arrowroot starch. Dipping your fingers into the flour pat the dough out with your fingers until it is 1/16 in/1.5 mm thick or you can sprinkle the dough with starch and then place a sheet of parchment paper on top. Roll out the dough until it is 1/16 in/1.15 mm thick and rectangular in shape.

3. Preheat the oven to 400 degrees F/204 degrees C. Allow the lavosh dough to rest 15 to 20 minutes before spreading the top with olive oil and sprinkling with seeds or coarse salt. Bake for 7 to 14 minutes, depending on how thin you were able to get your dough.  Cool completely on a rack before serving.